11:19 am - Fri, Jan 13, 2012
30 notes

hand-me-downs-et-cetera:

Is the American dream fading?

With more people living on the breadline in the US, we ask if it is time to abandon the American dream.
again, follow my personal blog if you care to see my current poverty-related media intake. i will not be update this blog consistently right now.
10:31 pm - Sun, Jan 8, 2012
190 notes
hand-me-downs-et-cetera:


Thanks to these Adlens glasses, people in developing countries can benefit from a luxury we take for granted: prescription glasses. Yes, we may complain about how expensive prescription glasses are, but in other parts of the world, such innovations are prohibitively expensive.

Adlens glasses, however, ingeniously inject water into the lenses in order to create adjustable magnification. At the turn of a knob, Adlens glasses are easily adjusted to individual vision needs. Available at Adaptive Eyewear, hopefully we’ll see more like-minded concepts in other health areas.


here’s a sample of what goes on over at my main tumblr. follow that for guaranteed continued posts from me. see last FYP post if you don’t follow what I’m saying.

hand-me-downs-et-cetera:

Thanks to these Adlens glasses, people in developing countries can benefit from a luxury we take for granted: prescription glasses. Yes, we may complain about how expensive prescription glasses are, but in other parts of the world, such innovations are prohibitively expensive.

Adlens glasses, however, ingeniously inject water into the lenses in order to create adjustable magnification. At the turn of a knob, Adlens glasses are easily adjusted to individual vision needs. Available at Adaptive Eyewear, hopefully we’ll see more like-minded concepts in other health areas.

here’s a sample of what goes on over at my main tumblr. follow that for guaranteed continued posts from me. see last FYP post if you don’t follow what I’m saying.

1:50 pm
1 note

Greetings,

I feel really bad that this blog has gone without management for so long.  I was abroad, in Guatemala, Nicaragua and Peru, for three months and since then have had a hard time of it getting readjusted to the states and the old life I came home to in western New York.  And sadly, I’m not here to say that I’m returning to activity here at this time, either. I’m only home for a week more and then I take off again. I’ll be in California in a media-free setting for a month, so clearly I won’t be posting from there. However, after that I’ll be going down to Bolivia for a 3 month period of working with a terrific project called Biblioworks (that’s a link) based in Sucre.  I’ll be working with libraries and literacy workshops. It’s possible that at this time I’ll start contributing to this blog once more.  It’s also possible that from there this blog will turn into a different thing, somewhat, and be mostly about the poverty/situation that I’m submerged in there.  Either way, I’m not deleting the account for I may return in some form eventually. But if not, I’d like to say thanks to all 800 of you, or whatever, who’ve been following this blog.  You’re all beautiful for people for being interested in the topic at all and I wish you all the best.  My personal tumblr is here, and that is relatively active, and I’d love to talk to any of you if you care to be in touch.  (plus it does have a considerable amount of poverty related posts between the music and personal hubbub) This topic, poverty, has become the driving question of my life and I’ve learned a lot by running this page and by getting out there and trying to make any difference that I can.  I urge you all to follow your questions, they may just get you where you have to be. In fact, I doubt you’ll find yourself anywhere else.  Godspeed.

—Joshua Murphy

11:14 pm - Thu, Sep 1, 2011
25 notes

gautamramdurai:

This is bloody fascinating - Matternet will alleviate poverty and accelerate economic growth for the rising billion through a roadless transportation network.

(Source: vimeo.com, via lysscglobal)

11:47 am - Wed, Aug 31, 2011
13 notes
11:02 pm - Sun, Aug 28, 2011
18 notes

Guatemala’s leaders face hunger crisis

lysscguatemala:

Guatemala is one of the world’s most important producers of sugar bananas and coffee yet the country’s children suffer among the highest rates of malnutrition. Deborah Bonello reports on the causes and what needs to be done to eradicate hunger in the country.

(Source: hiptipico, via lysscglobal)

5:15 pm
16 notes
thesteppenwolf:

 

Says Josue de Castro: “I, who have received an international peace prize, think that, unhappily, there is no other solution than violence for Latin America.”  In the eye of this hurricane 120 million children are stirring.  Latin America’s population grows as does no other: it has more than tripled in half a century. One child dies of disease or hunger every minute, but in the year 2000 there will be 650 million Latin Americans, half of whom will be under fifteen: a time bomb.  Among the 280 million Latin Americans of today, 50 million are unemployed or underemployed and about 100 million are illiterate;half of them live in crowded, unhealthy slums.

—Eduardo Galeano, Introduction to Open Veins of Latin America  (1973)

thesteppenwolf:

Says Josue de Castro: “I, who have received an international peace prize, think that, unhappily, there is no other solution than violence for Latin America.”  In the eye of this hurricane 120 million children are stirring.  Latin America’s population grows as does no other: it has more than tripled in half a century. One child dies of disease or hunger every minute, but in the year 2000 there will be 650 million Latin Americans, half of whom will be under fifteen: a time bomb.  Among the 280 million Latin Americans of today, 50 million are unemployed or underemployed and about 100 million are illiterate;half of them live in crowded, unhealthy slums.

—Eduardo Galeano, Introduction to Open Veins of Latin America  (1973)

9:03 pm - Tue, Aug 16, 2011
6,495 notes
2:51 pm - Sun, Aug 14, 2011
1 note
12:25 pm
15 notes

exaequo:

ScienceDaily (June 18, 2011) — How researchers classify and quantify causes of death across a population has evolved in recent decades. In addition to long-recognized physiological causes such as heart attack and cancer, the role of behavioral factors — including smoking, dietary patterns and inactivity — began to be quantified in the 1990s. More recent research has begun to look at the contribution of social factors to U.S. mortality. In the first comprehensive analysis of such studies, researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health found that poverty, low levels of education, poor social support and other social factors contribute about as many deaths in the U.S. as such familiar causes as heart attacks, strokes and lung cancer.

The full study findings are published online ahead of print in the American Journal of Public Health.

The research team, led by Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH, chair of the Mailman School Department of Epidemiology, estimated the number of U.S. deaths attributable to social factors using a systematic review of the available literature combined with vital statistics data. They conducted a MEDLINE search for all English-language articles published between 1980 and 2007 with estimates of the relation between social factors and adult all-cause mortality. Ultimately they considered 47 studies for meta-analysis. After calculating for the relative risks of mortality from social factors, researchers obtained prevalence estimates for each social factor using primarily Census Bureau data. Individual social factors included education, poverty, health insurance status, employment status and job stress, social support, racism or discrimination, housing conditions and early childhood stressors. Area-level social factors included area-level poverty, income inequality, deteriorating built environment, racial segregation, crime and violence, social capital and availability of open or green spaces.

The investigators found that approximately 245,000 deaths in the United States in the year 2000 were attributable to low levels of education, 176,000 to racial segregation, 162,000 to low social support, 133,000 to individual-level poverty, 119,000 to income inequality, and 39,000 to area-level poverty.

Overall, 4.5% of U.S. deaths were found to be attributable to poverty — midway between previous estimates of 6% and 2.3%. However the risks associated with both poverty and low education were higher for individuals aged 25 to 64 than for those 65 or older.

“Social causes can be linked to death as readily as can pathophysiological and behavioral causes,” points out Dr. Galea, who is also Gelman Professor of Epidemiology. For example, the number of deaths the researchers calculated as attributable to low education (245,000) is comparable to the number caused by heart attacks (192,898), which was the leading cause of U.S. deaths in 2000. The number of deaths attributable to racial segregation (176,000) is comparable to the number from cerebrovascular disease (167,661), the third leading cause of death in 2000, and the number attributable to low social support (162,000) compares to deaths from lung cancer (155,521).

“These findings argue for a broader public health conceptualization of the causes of mortality and an expansive policy approach that considers how social factors can be addressed to improve the health of populations,” observed Dr. Galea.

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

I can only imagine what the international statistics look like…

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